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A Bridge Too Far

By Greg L | 14 April 2010 | Prince William County | 11 Comments

The Prince William County School Board is meeting tomorrow to consider whether to appeal the decision of the planning commission regarding adding an Elementary School to the site of Stonewall Middle School to the Prince William Board of County Supervisors.  Of course there’s hardly any advance notice for this meeting (as Virginia law would seem to require), nor much in the way for citizen input (as usual).  It’s just the School Board driving ahead on their own.  Damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead.

I understand this attitude from Don “You Parents Need To Grow Up” Richardson, someone who apparently has no interest in being re-elected and has the political aptitude of a rotting fish.  I’m just not sure if anyone else on the board wants to join him.

If the School Board appeals this to the Board of County Supervisors, which is a lot more sensitive to the political winds than the School Board has ever had the capacity to be, this proposal is DOA, not-gonna-happen, let’s watch the BOCS happily gobble up the political red meat kind of exercise.  There’s no constituency for this inane proposal other than the School Board Staff, and plenty of constituency among the citizenry opposing it.  Loudly opposing it, and bringing people together in united opposition that weren’t necessarily on great terms with each other until this flared up.  But they’re coming together to oppose the School Board.

As usual, the School Board seems to take it’s public relations lead from Joseph Stalin, only without the deadly calls to massacre people’s families who oppose their will, but with the same heavy hand and not-so-delicate touch.  They brand those who don’t agree with this plan as racists, incompetents, or just stupid parents who should defer to the wiser and more enlightened school system staff who can lead us into the glorious future, if only pesky proles like us would just get the heck out of the way.  That kind of attitude is about as effective as trying to out out a fire with a flamethrower, and has so far engulfed the neighborhood in a firestorm of opposition that is so universal as to be remarkable.

Arnheim was easier for the Allies to capture.  Adding an elementary school to the site of Stonewall Middle School is the political ‘bridge too far’ to seize for the School Board, and any effort to take it will exact a very heavy political price.

UPDATE: The meeting, it turns out is sort of a virtual one, with some sort of “straw poll” being the main agenda item.  How this supposedly complies with Virginia’s open government laws hasn’t been explained, but it seems that despite the rushed and informal manner in which the School Board is moving forward they are.  Well, if they want a fight, they’ll be going to the right place to get one.



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11 Comments

  1. ON THE GO said on 14 Apr 2010 at 10:03 pm:
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    I do not believe the BOS will over turn the Planning Commission.

    If the SB is smart they will forget it.
    It is time for Richardson to go.He has become very arrogant. Theres a few more who need to go. We need to find some good candidates.

    So everyone keep a look out for many seats across the County.

  2. Allison said on 15 Apr 2010 at 3:58 am:
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    I learned last night that the School Board is not actually meeting today - they are conducting a “straw poll” today on whether or not to appeal.

    Their contact information: http://www.pwcs.edu/admin/schboard/

    Please take the time to make your voice heard via e-mail or phone call as early this morning as possible.

  3. Patty said on 15 Apr 2010 at 8:37 pm:
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    Now I understand the the School Board is submitting an appeal so that they can discuss the matter at their meeting on Wednesday. What is there to discuss? They knew enough about it to send their lawyer to the Planning Commission to fight for this proposed elementary school. Now they make it sound like they didn’t do their homework. And yet they are members of the School Board. Unbelievable! Incredible!

    If any member of the School Board is reading this, SHAME ON YOU! How many times do residents have to go to your controlled meetings to protest this school? Of course you restrict citizen comment time to where it is impossible for us to speak to you. Why is that? Why is it so restricted in that someone has to call ahead of time in order to be assured of a time slot to speak. Suppose we call tomorrow and all the time slots are full… what then? I know. You make us wait at the end of the line until it gets so late that we have to go home. So much for open government.

    Go ahead and appeal it to the BOCS. At least we know we can speak before them.

    To those who travel down Lomond Drive especailly in the mornings and afternoons, the School Board wants to give you double of this:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KrIvEfWqGUI

    Yes, the PWC School Board wants to create the biggest gridlock of traffic on Lomond Drive that will surpass Rte 123 as the biggest bottleneck in Northern Virginia.

  4. Ray B. said on 16 Apr 2010 at 10:08 am:
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    “The meeting, it turns out is sort of a virtual one, with some sort of “straw poll” being the main agenda item. How this supposedly complies with Virginia’s open government laws hasn’t been explained,….”

    Greg, this polling is authorized under the Virginia FOIA - and does become a public record. VA Code 2.2-3710B allows for polling to transact public business “other than by votes”, BUT only “for the purpose of ascertaining a member’s position with respect to the transaction of public business”.

    To do anything with the information, the Board has to convene and enter the results of the poll into the formal record. What they will probably forget is a record has to be made of any personal conversations and telephone calls, and those are added in the file with all the emails so the public record of the poll is complete. This is where folks trip up - forgetting the conversational records of the poll.

  5. Allison said on 17 Apr 2010 at 4:27 am:
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    Ray B.

    How do we go about getting FOIAing the results of the way they voted?

  6. Allison said on 17 Apr 2010 at 5:44 am:
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    getting/FOIAing - sorry for the omission

  7. Allison said on 17 Apr 2010 at 7:16 am:
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    Here is a link to the Appeal:

    http://www.pwcs.edu/News2/announcements/StonewallESSchoolBoardAppeal.pdf

  8. Greg L said on 17 Apr 2010 at 7:45 am:
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    As far as a FOIA, all you have to do is request a copy of the minutes of the meeting at which this was decided. It should record all votes taken.

  9. Allison said on 17 Apr 2010 at 8:46 am:
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    But if this decision were reached over the telephone, does FOIA apply?

  10. Greg L said on 17 Apr 2010 at 11:40 am:
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    Open government laws prohibit an official meeting being conducted over the phone unless there’s an opportunity for citizens to listen in. There has to be adequate notice as well. Just because there’s a deadline coming up doesn’t mean the SB gets an exception to the law.

    Heck, they should have known this would go badly and scheduled a meeting prior to the planning commission’s determination, and then they could cancel it if it wasn’t needed. Instead, the consistently brain-dead staff at the glass-enclosed Independent Hill Palace screws up and then quite possibly breaks the law trying to react to the results of their stupidity.

    Back to the point, FOIA always applies.

  11. Greg L said on 17 Apr 2010 at 11:44 am:
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    Here’s the applicable statute from the Code of Virginia:

    § 2.2-3707. Meetings to be public; notice of meetings; recordings; minutes.

    A. All meetings of public bodies shall be open, except as provided in §§ 2.2-3707.01 and 2.2-3711.

    B. No meeting shall be conducted through telephonic, video, electronic or other communication means where the members are not physically assembled to discuss or transact public business, except as provided in §§2.2-3708, 2.2-3708.1 or as may be specifically provided in Title 54.1 for the summary suspension of professional licenses.

    C. Every public body shall give notice of the date, time, and location of its meetings by placing the notice in a prominent public location at which notices are regularly posted and in the office of the clerk of the public body, or in the case of a public body that has no clerk, in the office of the chief administrator. All state public bodies subject to the provisions of this chapter shall also post notice of their meetings on their websites and on the electronic calendar maintained by the Virginia Information Technologies Agency commonly known as the Commonwealth Calendar. Publication of meeting notices by electronic means by other public bodies shall be encouraged. The notice shall be posted at least three working days prior to the meeting. Notices for meetings of state public bodies on which there is at least one member appointed by the Governor shall state whether or not public comment will be received at the meeting and, if so, the approximate point during the meeting when public comment will be received.

    D. Notice, reasonable under the circumstance, of special or emergency meetings shall be given contemporaneously with the notice provided members of the public body conducting the meeting.

    E. Any person may annually file a written request for notification with a public body. The request shall include the requester’s name, address, zip code, daytime telephone number, electronic mail address, if available, and organization, if any. The public body receiving such request shall provide notice of all meetings directly to each such person. Without objection by the person, the public body may provide electronic notice of all meetings in response to such requests.

    F. At least one copy of all agenda packets and, unless exempt, all materials furnished to members of a public body for a meeting shall be made available for public inspection at the same time such documents are furnished to the members of the public body.

    G. Nothing in this chapter shall be construed to prohibit the gathering or attendance of two or more members of a public body (i) at any place or function where no part of the purpose of such gathering or attendance is the discussion or transaction of any public business, and such gathering or attendance was not called or prearranged with any purpose of discussing or transacting any business of the public body or (ii) at a public forum, candidate appearance, or debate, the purpose of which is to inform the electorate and not to transact public business or to hold discussions relating to the transaction of public business, even though the performance of the members individually or collectively in the conduct of public business may be a topic of discussion or debate at such public meeting. The notice provisions of this chapter shall not apply to informal meetings or gatherings of the members of the General Assembly.

    H. Any person may photograph, film, record or otherwise reproduce any portion of a meeting required to be open. The public body conducting the meeting may adopt rules governing the placement and use of equipment necessary for broadcasting, photographing, filming or recording a meeting to prevent interference with the proceedings.

    I. Minutes shall be recorded at all open meetings. However, minutes shall not be required to be taken at deliberations of (i) standing and other committees of the General Assembly, (ii) legislative interim study commissions and committees, including the Virginia Code Commission, (iii) study committees or commissions appointed by the Governor, or (iv) study commissions or study committees, or any other committees or subcommittees appointed by the governing bodies or school boards of counties, cities and towns, except where the membership of any such commission, committee or subcommittee includes a majority of the governing body of the county, city or town or school board.

    Minutes, including draft minutes, and all other records of open meetings, including audio or audio/visual records shall be deemed public records and subject to the provisions of this chapter.

    Minutes shall be in writing and shall include (i) the date, time, and location of the meeting; (ii) the members of the public body recorded as present and absent; and (iii) a summary of the discussion on matters proposed, deliberated or decided, and a record of any votes taken. In addition, for electronic communication meetings conducted in accordance with § 2.2-3708, minutes of state public bodies shall include (a) the identity of the members of the public body at each remote location identified in the notice who participated in the meeting through electronic communications means, (b) the identity of the members of the public body who were physically assembled at the primary or central meeting location, and (c) the identity of the members of the public body who were not present at the locations identified in clauses (a) and (b), but who monitored such meeting through electronic communications means.

    ….

    § 2.2-3708. Electronic communication meetings.

    A. Except as expressly provided in subsection G of this section or § 2.2-3708.1, no local governing body, school board, or any authority, board, bureau, commission, district or agency of local government, any committee thereof, or any entity created by a local governing body, school board, or any local authority, board, or commission shall conduct a meeting wherein the public business is discussed or transacted through telephonic, video, electronic or other communication means where the members are not physically assembled. Nothing in this section shall be construed to prohibit the use of interactive audio or video means to expand public participation.

    B. Except as provided in subsection D of § 2.2-3707.01, state public bodies may conduct any meeting wherein the public business is discussed or transacted through electronic communication means, provided (i) a quorum of the public body is physically assembled at one primary or central meeting location, (ii) notice of the meeting has been given in accordance with subsection C, and (iii) the remote locations, from which additional members of the public body participate through electronic communication means, are open to the public. All persons attending the meeting at any of the meeting locations shall be afforded the same opportunity to address the public body as persons attending the primary or central location. State public bodies, however, may meet by electronic communication means without a quorum of the public body physically assembled at one location when (a) the Governor has declared a state of emergency in accordance with §44-146.17, (b) the meeting is necessary to take action to address the emergency, and (c) the public body otherwise complies with the provisions of this section.

    If an authorized public body holds an electronic meeting pursuant to this section, it shall also hold at least one meeting annually where members in attendance at the meeting are physically assembled at one location and where no members participate by electronic communication means.

    C. Notice of any meetings held pursuant to this section shall be provided at least three working days in advance of the date scheduled for the meeting. The notice shall include the date, time, place, and purpose for the meeting; shall identify the locations for the meeting; and shall include a telephone number that may be used at remote locations to notify the primary or central meeting location of any interruption in the telephonic or video broadcast of the meeting to the remote locations. Any interruption in the telephonic or video broadcast of the meeting shall result in the suspension of action at the meeting until repairs are made and public access restored.

    D. Agenda packets and, unless exempt, all materials that will be distributed to members of the public body and that have been made available to the staff of the public body in sufficient time for duplication and forwarding to all locations where public access will be provided shall be made available to the public at the time of the meeting. Minutes of all meetings held by electronic communication means shall be recorded as required by §2.2-3707. Votes taken during any meeting conducted through electronic communication means shall be recorded by name in roll-call fashion and included in the minutes.

    E. Three working days’ notice shall not be required for meetings authorized under this section held in accordance with subsection G that are continued to address an emergency or to conclude the agenda of the meeting for which proper notice has been given, when the date, time, place, and purpose of the continued meeting are set during the meeting prior to adjournment. Public bodies conducting emergency meetings through electronic communication means shall comply with the provisions of subsection D requiring minutes of the meeting. The nature of the emergency shall be stated in the minutes.

    F. Any authorized public body that meets by electronic communication means shall make a written report of the following to the Virginia Freedom of Information Advisory Council and the Joint Commission on Technology and Science by December 15 of each year:

    1. The total number of electronic communication meetings held that year;

    2. The dates and purposes of the meetings;

    3. The number of sites for each meeting;

    4. The types of electronic communication means by which the meetings were held;

    5. The number of participants, including members of the public, at each meeting location;

    6. The identity of the members of the public body recorded as absent and those recorded as present at each meeting location;

    7. A summary of any public comment received about the electronic communication meetings; and

    8. A written summary of the public body’s experience using electronic communication meetings, including its logistical and technical experience.

    G. Any local governing body, school board, or any authority, board, bureau, commission, district, or agency of local government may meet by electronic communication means without a quorum of the public body physically assembled at one location when the Governor has declared a state of emergency in accordance with § 44-146.17, provided (i) the catastrophic nature of the declared emergency makes it impracticable or unsafe to assemble a quorum in a single location and (ii) the purpose of the meeting is to address the emergency. The local public body convening a meeting in accordance with this subsection shall (a) give public notice using the best available method given the nature of the emergency, which notice shall be given contemporaneously with the notice provided members of the local public body conducting the meeting; (b) make arrangements for public access to such meeting; and (c) otherwise comply with the provisions of this section. The nature of the emergency and the fact that the meeting was held by electronic communication means shall be stated in the minutes.

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